What Exactly Is the U.S. Vetting Process for Syrian Refugees?

Ever since the Paris Attack everyone and their mother have stated their thoughts on the Syrian refugees and the possibility of refugees in their background. From Donald Trump‘s ridiculous Muslim Tracking database, Jeb Bush‘s idea of only letting in Syrian Christians, to the billion of Facebook posts comparing locking the doors to your house to protect your family and that’s how we should treat refugees.

While I can understand people on Facebook being uninformed, it beyond frustrating to hear those who should know say the dumbest things.

It’s natural to have a fear of terrorism, but we shouldn’t let our fears replace facts!

And social media is not the place to find the facts….

Before people decide that closing the borders is the only way, let’s first understand what exactly is the vetting process for refugees trying to come to the United States

How do refugees come to the United States?

Potential refugees first apply for refugee status through the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), the international body in charge of protecting and assisting refugees.

The UNHCR essentially decides who merits refugee status based on the parameters laid out in the 1951 Refugee Convention, which states that a refugee is someone who “owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality, and is unable to, or owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country.”

READ: Passport linked to terrorist complicates Syrian refugee crisis

If it’s demonstrated that the refugee in question meets the above conditions, the applicant may be referred by the UNHRC for resettlement in a third country, such as the United States, where he or she will be given legal resident status and eventually be able to apply for citizenship.

After the UNHCR refers a refugee applicant to the United States, the application is processed by a federally funded Resettlement Support Center, which gathers information about the candidate to prepare for an intensive screening process, which includes an interview, a medical evaluation and an inter-agency security screening process aimed at ensuring the refugee does not pose a threat to the United States.

The average processing time for refugee applications is 18 to 24 months, but Syrian applications can take significantly longer because of security concerns and difficulties in verifying their information.

READ: Paul Ryan calls for pause in refugee program

Once they’ve completed that part of the process, the refugee is paired with a resettlement agency in the United States to assist in his or her transition to the country. That organization provides support services, such as language and vocational training, as well as monetary assistance for housing and other necessities.

What’s the security vetting process like?

Much attention has been focused on the security vetting refugees must go through before they come to the United States, particularly after it was revealed that one of the terrorists in the Paris attacks entered Europe through a refugee processing center.

Several federal agencies, including the State Department, the Department of Homeland Security, the Defense Department, the National Counterterrorism Center and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, are involved in the process, which Deputy State Department Spokesman Mark Toner recently called, “the most stringent security process for anyone entering the United States.”

READ: Donald Trump: Syrian refugees a ‘Trojan horse’

These agencies use biographical and biometric information about applicants to conduct a background check and make sure applicants really are who they say they are.

The applicant is interviewed by a DHS officer with training in this screening process as well as specialized training for Syrian and Iraqi refugee cases.

And refugees from Syria actually go through another layer of screening, called the Syria Enhanced Review process.

“With the Syrian program, we’ve benefited from our years of experience in vetting Iraqi refugee applicants,” a senior administration official recently told reporters. “And so the partnerships we have today and the security checks we have today really are more robust because of the experience that we’ve had since the beginning of large-scale Iraqi processing in 2007.”

Another senior administration official noted that the refugee screening process is constantly refined.

FACTS MATTER, and these facts fly in the face of the nonsense on social media. It’s really not that difficult to find the truth, and debating facts leads to a more productive conversation.

As always….

If there is something to be said, “It’s On Broadway” to step up and say it!!

Credit: CNN

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Author: Bobby Broadway

Born and raised in the Borough of Queens; with the backdrop of Manhattan only a stones throw away. I'm a college educated man with Independent thought, who is not afraid of an debate. It's very simple, you respect me and I will respect you...

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